Life on the hard

Wait. What? Life on the hard is what we refer to as living on your boat while its on land. june 1st is the first day of hurricane season. That is when most insurance companies require boats to be at a certain designation and remain there until hurricane season is over. For us, that location is anywhere north of Cumberland Island. We decided we liked Jekyll Island and would make that our home base during hurricane season. This year, we will get there late. The boat needed some things done and in order to do them, we needed to pull the boat out of the water. We opted to do this in Green Cove springs this time. Our boat is nestled in among about a hundred other boats. Some owners choose to do their own work, while others hire someone to do it for them. We are somewhere in the middle. We have been doing our own repairs, but we hired someone to sand and paint the bottom of our boat. This allows us to move on to other things in hopes that we will finish faster and can get back in the water. Its been interesting living on the boat while it is on land, being held up by boat stands. Here are some things I have learned in the last few weeks:

1. Getting off and on the boat takes time. Getting off the boat requires you to go up the companionway steps, maneuver through whatever tools your husband has left laying out, and climb down the steep ladder to the ground. Many times your hands will be full, requiring stealth balancing skills.
2. Once you get off the boat, you will almost always have to go back up for something you forgot. Just reverse #1
3. Getting groceries on the boat takes time and creativity. We often use a rope to haul them up.
4. The cockpit lockers are always 20 degrees hotter and you will need to be in them for most of the day.
5. Whatever goes down your sink, ends up in a puddle under your boat.
6. Not everyone here is working on their boats. There are some boats here that look like they have been here a while and have no intention of going anywhere anytime soon. No one is ever seen working on them. Yet there are people living on them.
7. Having shade comes at a cost of having mosquitos. But it is totally worth it.
8. I miss the motion of the ocean. I like the bobbing affect you get being on water.
9. I like having shore power. That means we can have a/c, tv, and can charge our phones without having to share a 12volt plug.

and finally,

10. This too shall pass. I don’t think I could do this for very long. We anticipated this would take us about 4-6 weeks. I think we are pretty much on schedule. To keep ourselves sane, we have gotten away from the boat when we could, even if its only for a dinner out or a weekend to Miami to see our son and daughter in law who were passing through. Hopefully we will be back in the water and on our way to Jekyll Island by July 1st.

It may suck at times, but life is still good.

Hauling out

Hauling out

Our shady spot

Our shady spot

Me, helping remove the fuel tank for cleaning

Me, helping remove the fuel tank for cleaning

Keith removing hoses to get to the fuel tank

Keith removing hoses to get to the fuel tank

polishing and waxing

polishing and waxing

from 7a-7p, the cockpit looks like this. Its cleaned up every evening for cocktail hour.

from 7a-7p, the cockpit looks like this. Its cleaned up every evening for cocktail hour.

The dreaded ladder

The dreaded ladder

sometimes people just give you a case of beer. Thanks Jacob, aka, capt Ron

sometimes people just give you a case of beer. Thanks Jacob, aka, capt Ron

cleaning rags in the work area

cleaning rags in our work area

2 thoughts on “Life on the hard

    • Thanks Hayden. That would be great to meet up next winter. We haven’t quite decided where we will go but Fl is definitely in the running. It’s looking like the boat will be back in the water by the end of June! Yay.

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